Summary

Australia Tasmania
Centenary of the Macintosh & Degraves Shilling Token 1923 (AD)
Mint: Stokes & Sons
Other Details: Medal issued in 1923 to commemorate the centenary of Macintosh and Degraves Tasmanian Shilling Token. The first tradesmen's token prepared in England for Australian use appeared in Van Diemen's Land in 1823. It was a silver shilling piece, prepared for partners Major Hugh Macintoish (or Macintosh) and Peter Degraves, operaters of the Cascade Saw Mill near Hobart. The token appeared in very small numbers. Some numismatists believe it was issued as an advertising piece; later research indicates that the token may not have been actually distributed until 1824 - 25 due to a legal case involving the partners and some of the paying passengers on the ship that they had hired to transport themselves and their equipment to the colony. The partners and their ship were delayed in London by the legal action, and they apparently did not arrive in the colony until late1824. With the word 'TASMANIA' on the reverse (plus a contemporary idea of a kangaroo), the token predated the actual official name-change for Van Diemen's Land by about 20 years.

Physical Description

A circular silver medal featuring a Kangaroo (based on the 1853 Kangaroo Office gold pieces) and detaining the commemoration of the centenary of the Tasmanian shilling token issued by Macintosh and Degraves.

Obverse Description

At centre within a broad rim a Kangaroo facing right; around, TASMANIA .1823 - 1923 . ; in exergue, in small letters the makers and designers initials, A.C. S & S

Reverse Description

. TO . / COMMEMORATE / THE CENTENARY / . OF THE . / ISSUE OF THE / MACINTOSH AND DEGRAVES / .TASMANIAN. / SHILLING

Edge Description

Plain

Significance

The first tradesmen's token prepared in England for Australian use appeared in Van Diemen's Land in 1823. It was a silver shilling piece, prepared for partners Major Hugh Macintoish (or Macintosh) and Peter Degraves, operaters of the Cascade Saw Mill near Hobart. The token appeared in very small numbers. Some numismatists believe it was issued as an advertising piece; later research indicates that the token may not have been actually distributed until 1824 - 25 due to an argument, then a legal case, involving the partners and some of the paying passengers on the ship that they had hired to transport themselves and their equipment to the colony. The partners and their ship were delayed in London by the legal action, and they apparently did not arrive in the colony until late1824.

With the word ‘TASMANIA’ on the reverse (plus a contemporary idea of a kangaroo), the token predated the actual official name-change for Van Diemen’s Land by about 20 years.

Few of these rare tokens survive, and there is no record of them being extensively used by the general public. Most may have been held by the partners as mementoes issued to celebrate the establishment of their business venture. -Petterwood, Graeme, 2004. Tasmanian Tradesmen's Tokens Re-Visited. The Tasmanian Numismatist, Volume 9 Issue 2, February 2004. -D. Tout-Smith 27/2/2004.

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