Summary

Australia Victoria
Royal Botanic Society of London Gold Prize Medal 1904 (AD)
Mint: John Pinches
Awarded to: Agent General for Victoria John William Taverner

Other Details: This medal was awarded to the Agent General for Victoria, the Hon. John William Taverner, by the Royal Botanic Society of London, for a display of Victorian produce. Taverner was minister for agriculture in two Victorian governments and president of the royal commission for the Greater Britain Exhibition of 1899. The Royal Botanic Society of London was founded in 1839 by royal charter and was granted an area of eighteen acres within the inner circle of Regent's park. Robert Marnock, one of the outstanding horticulturalists and garden designers of the 19th century, laid out the gardens very much as they still are today. Shortly after its establishment, annual exhibitions or flower-shows were begun, and such exhibitions, not entirely confined to flowers, are still one of the features of the society. Queen Victoria agreed to be Patron of the Society, and members of the royal family, such as Mary of Teck, presented some of the prizes.

Physical Description

A gold medal (51 mm diameter) of the Royal Botanic Society of London featuring a lush plant grouping and details of the award within a wreath of roses, shamrocks and thistles.

Obverse Description

A variety of plants; in exergue, 1839 and in tiny letters B.WYON SC.

Reverse Description

Engraved within crowned wreath of roses, thistles and shamrocks, THE AGENT GENERAL / FOR VICTORIA / for / VICTORIAN PRODUCE. / 1904.; around, ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY OF LONDON (Struck from worn die letters of ROYAL worn); and in tiny letters B.WYON

Edge Description

Plain

Significance

This medal was awarded to the Agent General for Victoria by the Royal Botanic Society of London. The Society was founded in 1839 by royal charter and was granted an area of eighteen acres within the inner circle of Regent's park. Robert Marnock, one of the outstanding horticulturalists and garden designers of the 19th century, laid out the gardens very much as they still are today. Shortly after its establishment, annual exhibitions or flower-shows were begun, and such exhibitions, not entirely confined to flowers, are still one of the features of the society. Queen Victoria agreed to be Patron of the Society, and members of the royal family, such as Mary of Teck, presented some of the prizes. -The Cambridge History of English and American Literature, Volume XIV. The Victorian Age, Part Two. http://www.bartleby.com/224/0833.html; Victorian London web site http://www.victorianlondon.org/entertainment/botanicalsociety.htm. -D. Tout-Smith 30/10/2003.

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