Summary

Alternative Name(s): Button, Pin

World War I-era pressed tin fundraising badge - 'For Our Own'. The badge features a branch of yellow wattle.

One of 24 fundraising badges attached to a black velvet ribbon. Purchased and collected by the donor's great-grandmother, Mrs LIllie Mary Hollinger, in Melbourne (probably Canterbury).

Badges were worn or displayed on ribbons during and after World War I, commemorating involvement in the war effort and expressing patriotism. They were generally made to raise funds for particular causes, including comforts and medical aid for those serving overseas; assisting widows and children of deceased soldiers; and assisting with the purchase of aids and treatment for soldiers who returned with disabilities.

This badge features a wattle motif, and may have been produced for Wattle Day. The first 'national' Wattle Day was celebrated in Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide on 1 September 1910. Wattle had become a symbol of Australia with the approach of Federation. It was particularly promoted by the Australian Natives' Association, established in 1871 and a strong advocate for native-born Australians and Federation. It later became an advocate for White Australia. Public support for Wattle Day peaked during World War I, when it was a potent symbol of home for military personnel serving overseas, and a means of raising money for organisations such as the Red Cross. Beautifully designed Wattle Day badges as well as wattle sprigs were sold. The influence of Wattle Day waned as the 20th century progressed, but in 1992 the Governor-General declared 1 September National Wattle Day.

Physical Description

Circular pressed tin badge featuring a branch/sprig of yellow wattle against a pale blue background. Inscribed across the top of the badge in dark red capitals. The back of the badge is a dull tin, with mild rust. A bent nail has been utilised as the pin and is attached through holes in the back of the badge.

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