Summary

Proceedings of the religious service held in the (Royal) Exhibition Building on the evening of 23 December 1929, to welcome the new Anglican Archbishop of Melbourne, the Most Reverend Frederick Waldegrave Head. In attendance were the Bishops of Gippsland, Bendigo, Ballarat, St Arnaud and Wangaratta. The three hour service, which was attended by 10,000 members of the public, was broadcast on local radio station 3LO.

After finishing a degree in history at Cambridge, Frederick Head was ordained deacon in 1902 and priest in 1903 by Bishop Alwyne Compton of Ely. He was appointed chaplain of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and served in that role until 1915. Considering himself too hold to sign-up, Head chose to volunteer for the Young Men's Christian Association in France. In 1916 he was appointed a chaplaincy with the Guard's Division. With the resumption of peace in 1919, Head returned to Cambridge. In 1922, Head was appointed vicar of the large, working-class parish of Christ Church in East Greenwich, London. That same year he was also appointed King George V's chaplain; Head regularly preached at Buckingham Palace and Sandringham. Head was appointed canon and sub-dean of Liverpool Cathedral in 1926, and in August 1912 he was offered the role of archbishop of Melbourne. Head was consecrated in Westminster Abbey on 1 November 1929, and he was enthroned in a ceremony held in the (Royal) Exhibition Building on 23 December 1929.

Head was held in high regard among the Anglican community across Victoria. He died from injuries sustained from a motor accident on 18 December 1941 while still in office. His ashes were interred in St Paul's Cathedral, Melbourne.

Description of Content

Printed proceedings, brown ink on cream paper. Image of F.W. Head Archbishop of Melbourne on top left of design. Plain border.

Physical Description

Printed proceedings, brown ink on cream paper. Image of F.W. Head Archbishop of Melbourne on top left of design. Plain border. Vertical and horizontal creases from previous folds. Foxing across top.

More Information