Summary

This scallop shaped mat by Djibugula Dhyangunga has been twined and created with alternate orange and purple bands intersected near the centre with cross-twining segments. Mats are referred to by the Kunwinjku term 'marebu'. The earliest mats collected during the early 20th century were created using the twining technique and made from grasses. Jill Nganjmirra identified the grass as 'modjeh' noting that it 'grows on the plain'. Kunwinjku women today make mats using fibre made from pandanus leaves and incorporate and combine a variety of techniques and colour to produce complex patterns.

Djibugula Dhyangunga incorporates cross-twining in her mats to produce complex patterning, and, as in this work, uses it to insert a single row in between rows of solid twining to form the pattern. She also uses small sections of cross-twining evenly spaced around the edge of a mat to form scallops. However in this work she has created an overall scalloping effect.

Images of baskets, mats and string bags appear in the oldest rock art sequences on the western Arnhem Land escarpment. They appear alongside dynamic anthropomorphic figures dated to around 20,000 years ago, and only one example of a fringed mat is known amongst the rock art of the region.

Physical Description

Circular mat, twined, created with alternate orange and purple bands intersected near the centre with cross-twining segments. The edges of each of the coloured bands is scalloped and the mat has a fringe.

Local Name

marebu

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