Summary

Alternative Name: 'hanko' or 'inkan' (Japanese)

Traditional name seal and wax belonging to Setsutaro Hasegawa. It was brought out from Japan by Setsutaro Hasegawa who migrated to Australia in 1897 at the age of 29. This was just four years before the introduction of the Immigration Restriction Act which virtually banned immigration to Australia from Asia. Hanko were initially only used by the Emperor, and from 750AD they were also used by the Japanese nobility. From 1870 onwards hanko came to be used throughout Japanese society.

Setsutaro Hasegawa migrated to Australia in 1897 at the age of 29. This was just four years before the introduction of the Immigration Restriction Act which virtually banned immigration to Australia from Asia. Setsutaro established a laundry business in Geelong. By 1910 he had married an Australian-born woman and had several children. In 1941 Setsutaro was interned at Tatura as an enemy alien, when he was over 70 years old. He was released at the end of World War II, and unlike most Japanese internees he was not deported. Setsutaro returned to Geelong where he remained for the rest of his life.

Physical Description

Small case in early plastic. Lid opens to reveal a round red seal with Japanese name characters with a metal hinge for removing the seal from the case and holding it. Next to the seal is a round inset container for red wax. There is also a brown corduroy pouch with brown string and purple string attached to metal ring for closing the top of the pouch.

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