Summary

Image of the headstone of James Ruse, a first fleet convict, who was the first ex-convict to seek a land grant. In November 1798 Ruse was permitted to occupy an allotment near Parramatta. However Governor Phillip withheld the title until his capacity as a farmer and his right to freedom had been proved. The governor was anxious to discover how long it would take an emancipist to become self-sufficient.

Ruse proved not only a hard worker but also an enlightened farmer who made effective use of the limited means at his disposal. By February 1791 he was able to support himself and his wife, Elizabeth Perry. In April 1791 he received the title to his land, the first grant issued in New South Wales. He died 5 September 1837.

Description of Content

Image of the headstone of James Ruse, a first fleet convict. In 1789 Ruse became the first Ruse was the first ex-convict to seek a land grant. In November of that year Governor Phillip permitted Ruse to occupy an allotment near Parramatta, withholding the title until his capacity as a farmer and his right to freedom had been proved. The governor made this concession because he knew Ruse to be industrious and because he was anxious to discover how long it would take an emancipist to become self-sufficient. Image taken from the 'Sunshine Review' December 1949, from 'Australia's First Farmer', precis of a paper red before the Royal Australian Historical Society by M. K. L. Sampson',

Physical Description

Copy of a Black & White Negative

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