Summary

Australia Victoria Creswick
Edward VII Coronation medal, 1902 (AD)
Boer War Peace medal, 1902
Mint: Stokes
Proof-like specimen strike, not holed
Other Details: The coronation of Edward VII in 1902 prompted major celebrations in Australia. It was an opportunity for the new nation to reaffirm its pride at being a key member of the British Empire. Over 40 different medals were produced around Australia, including this one issued by the Shire of Creswick. Creswick was one of thousands of towns around Australia which sent soldiers to the Boer war, and it combined its commemoration of this sacrifice with an expression of its loyalty to the newly crowned Edward VII. Creswick, 20km north of Ballarat, was established in the 1850s after gold was discovered in Creswick Creek. It boomed in the first decade, with up to 25,000 miners in the area. By 1861, however, the population was just 4,714, which was to be the highest ever recorded in a census. Deep lead mining took over as alluvial gold supplies ran out, and the rich volcanic soil was used to grow oats and wheat. Cattle grazing gradually expanded as the land was cleared of its forsests, with remnants of potato farming. The forests were re-planted from the late nineteenth century, founding an on-going forestry industry in the area. By the turn of the century, however, mining was still a significant local activity, and even in the centre of the town, at a former Chinese camp, sluicing was being conducted.

Obverse Description

At centre, within line circle conjoined busts of Edward VII and Queen Alexandra; around, EDWARD VII AND ALEXANDRA 0; below, CROWNED 26 JUNE / 1902. Struck on a shield shaped flan with a crown and loop at the top

Reverse Description

Bird flying left with twig in beak; around above, BRITISH - BOAR WAR below on ribbon, PEACE WITH HONOR below, DECLARED 1.6.1902 / PRESENTED / BY / SHIRE OF CRESWICK

Edge Description

Plain

Significance

The coronation of Edward VII in 1902 prompted major celebrations in Australia. It was an opportunity for the new nation to reaffirm its pride at being a key member of the British Empire. Over 40 different medals were produced around Australia, including this one issued by the Shire of Creswick. Crewsick was one of thousands of towns around Australia which sent soldiers to the Boar war, and it combined its commemoration of this sacrifice with an expression of its loyalty to the newly crowned Edward VII. Creswick, 20km north of Ballarat, was established in the 1850s after gold was discovered in Creswick Creek. It boomed in the first decade, with up to 25,000 miners in the area. By 1861, however, the population was just 4,714, which was to be the highest ever recorded in a census. Deep lead mining took over as alluvial gold supplies ran out, and the rich volcanic soil was used to grow oats and wheat. Cattle grazing gradually expanded as the land was cleared of its forsests, with remnants of potato farming. The forests were re-planted from the late nineteenth century, founding an on-going forestry industry in the area. By the turn of the century, however, mining was still a significant local activity, and even in the centre of the town, at a former Chinese camp, sluicing was being conducted.-Australian Places web site, Monash University, http://arts.monash.edu/ncas/multimedia/gazetteer/list/creswick.html. -D. Tout-Smith 24/11/2003.

More Information