Pedestal base table made from Australian native timbers and inlaid with depictions of native flowers. Probably made of Coast Banksia (banskia integrifolia) (proteaceae) for legs & stand, Blackwood (acacia melanoxylon) (leguminosae) for supports & most of the inlay, Forrest Red Gum (eucalyptus tereticornis) (myrtaceae) may have been used for sepals. Made by Edwin Ault within the period 1900-1950.

Edwin Ault was raised in Dromana, Victoria and was a first generation immigrant from Staffordshire, UK. Edwin worked as a motor mechanic and also spent a period fixing jetties.
Edwin's love for wood work was shared by his family. His father, H.W Ault, possessed a strong interest in wood and plants, and Edwin's brother, Ernest Ault, was a builder, joiner and woodworker. Edwin was keen to share his passion for his craft and would often show family members and friends how to do woodwork. It has been suggested by family members that Edwin's wife made some of the woodwork objects in their home, including for instance, some bread boards.

In 1912, at age 32, Edwin met and married his wife (Emma Hermine Ault nee Wilhelm). They lived in Lakes Entrance (initially known as Cunningham), where they raised their children. Recurrent motifs in Edwin's work including, for instance, the greenhood orchid, reflect the indigenous and introduced flora which grew in the locality of his property in Lakes Entrance. Edwin's work, whilst highly decorative in its detailed representation of plants, was also designed to serve functional purposes. Egg cups, carving boards and book ends were used by his family on an every-day basis, and are still remembered fondly by Edwin's grandchildren.

In his work, Edwin favoured a free form approach. He respected the original form of the wood and would shape it according to its natural pattern and form. It is believed that some of his pieces, including for instance, one of his picture frames, is made of drift wood. Edwin would air-dry his wood, or sometimes season it by placing it in crayfish pots, and steeping it in river and sea water. It is significant that Edwin's work utilises functional elements such as bolts and screws, reflecting his background in engineering. Edwin's work, with its intricate depictions of indigenous Australian and introduced plants, and its highly functional elements drawn from engineering practice, can provide valuable insight into the Australian arts and crafts movement and the lifestyle of Victorian families of the time.

Physical Description

Pedestal base table with s polished finish. Joints are fixed by using engineers bolts and woodscrews.

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