Summary

Alternative Name(s): Button

Limbless Soldiers Association Appeal badge, made in 1926.

The Limbless Soldiers Association existed from at least 1915, during World War I, when it made representations to the Federal Government regarding the preservation of jobs of limbless soldiers, and the 'compulsory' employment of a percentage of disabled ex-soldiers by large employers. It also argued that limbless soldiers' associations should be regarded as charitable organisations for the purpose of donations. Limbless soldiers' associations were set up in many states, including Victoria.

Physical Description

Badge featuring white triangle over dark blue background, topped by a white crown. Inscription within and below triangle. Single metal pin on reverse.

Significance

The various Limbless Soldiers Associations provided important support - political, symbolic and practical - to soldiers who had fought in World War I.

According to the North Western Advocate and the Emu Bay Times (Tasmania), 15 July 1915, p.7, ‘Wives of disabled returned soldiers will receive full restoration, of their pensions, the Minister for Repatriation (Mr. Marr) told a deputation representing the Limbless Soldiers' Association to-day. Sympathetic consideration has also been promised by the Prime Minister (Mr. Lyons) and Mr. Marr to a number of other requests which the deputation submitted on behalf of disabled ex-soldiers':

- 'That disabled and limbless ex soldiers, whose positions become redundant in the Federal public service, should be given preference in reinstatement.'
- 'That war pensions should not be treated as income for the purpose of the Invalid and Old Age Pensions Act.'
- 'That limbless soldiers' associations should be regarded as charitable organisations for the purpose of donations which may be deducted in the assessment of income for taxation'
- 'That legislation should be introduced for the compulsory employment by large employers' of a percentage of disabled ex-soldiers.’

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