Physical Description

One rim fragment of a cream-coloured porcelain tea cup with three thin gilded bands near the rim. This type of cheap gilded decoration was manufactured from the mid-19th century.

Physical Description

One rim fragment of a cream-coloured porcelain tea cup with three thin gilded bands near the rim. This type of cheap gilded decoration was manufactured from the mid-19th century.

More Information

  • Collection Names

    Royal Exhibition Building Western Forecourt Collection

  • Collecting Areas

    Public Life & Institutions, Historical Archaeology

  • Acquisition Information

    Transfer from Godden Mackay Logan Heritage Consultants (GML), Department of Archaeology, La Trobe University, Australia Gallery, History & Technology Department, Museum Victoria, 20/11/2009

  • Manufacture Date

    Mid-19th century- mid-20th century

  • Context Number

    G12/13//

  • Site

    Royal Exhibition Building Western Forecourt

  • Distinguishing Marks

    'Bright liquid gold', a cheap method of gilding, was developed in Germany in 1836 and introduced to Staffordshire circa 1855.

  • Activity

    Food service

  • Specific Activity

    Tea consumption

  • Decoration

    Gilt

  • Colour

    Gold

  • Classification

    Historical archaeology, Food service, Tea consumption

  • Category

    History & Technology

  • Discipline

    Archaeology - Historical

  • Type of item

    Object

  • References

    Majewski and O'Brien 1987: 153; Miller 1991: 9; Klose and Malan 2004: 54
    [Article - Journal] Majewski, T & O'Brien, M J. 1987. The Use and Misuse of Nineteenth-Century English and American Ceramics in Archaeological Analysis. Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory. 11: 97-209., 1987, 153 Pages
    [Article - Journal] Miller, George L. A Revised Set of CC Index Values for Classification and Economic Scaling of English Ceramics from 1787 to 1880. Historical Archaeology. 25 (1): 1-25., 1991, 9 Pages
    [Article - Journal] Klose, J & Malan, A. The Ceramic Signature of the Cape in the Nineteenth Century, with Particular Reference to the Tenant Street Site, Cape Town. The South African Archaeological Bulletin. 55: 49-59., 2004, 54 Pages

  • Keywords

    Archaeology, Eating & Dining, Royal Exhibition Building, World Heritage