Summary

King's South Africa Medal 1901-1902. Issued by Great Britain, 1902. Awarded to Private G. Anderson for service in the Boer War.

The death of Queen Victoria in 1901 saw her successor, Edward VII, authorise a medal for those serving in South Africa on or after 01 January 1902, who would complete 18 months service before 01 June 1902. The medal was not issued alone but always with the Queen's Medal.

In 1899 the Boers (Dutch–Afrikaner settlers) of the Orange Free State and Transvaal in South Africa declared war on their British neighbours by invading the colonies of Natal and Cape Colony; a result of ongoing tensions between the two groups. The Australian colonies offered troops to serve in contingents raised by the six colonies or, from 1901, by the new Australian Commonwealth. Some Australians also joined British or South African colonial units. The war continued for three years, but by 1902 the British had defeated Boer resistance. The Peace of Vereeniging in 1902 installed a pro-British civil administration.

Obverse Description

A bust of Edward VII in Field Marshal's uniform facing left; around, EDWARD VII REX IMPERATOR, the artist's initials, DES (G.W. de Saulles) is below the base of the bust.

Reverse Description

Britannia advancing facing right towards a column of marching soldiers, her trident, shield and a palm branch are on the ground behind her; in her left arm she holds a flag and with her right arm extends an laurel wreath towards the column, the fleet is at anchor in the background; around above, VICTORIA REGINA ET IMPERATRIX, the artist's G.W. de Saulles is incuse on the base of the bust. The reverse depicts Britannia advancing facing right towards a column of marching soldiers, her trident, shield and a palm branch are on the ground behind her; in her left arm she holds a flag and with her right arm extends an laurel wreath towards the column, the fleet is at anchor in the background; around above, MEDITERRANEAN.

Edge Description

R.17. PRIVATE. G. ANDERSON INTELCE. DEPT.

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